Articles

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Bartholomew Roberts “Black Barty” was probably the most successful pirate, (after Henry Morgan) there ever was. He was born a Welshman in 1682 and was second mate on the Princess when her captain died. He then was named captain. His other ships were named the Royal Rover, Fortune, Royal Fortune, and Good Fortune. He captured more than 400 hundred ships from as far North as Newfoundland, through the Caribbean, South America and in 1722 was felled by grapeshot in the throat doing battle with a British warship off the coast of Guinea, Africa. Roberts was an attractive man and a snappy dresser. He would wear a rich crimson waistcoat and breeches, a hat with a red feather, and a diamond cross hanging from a gold chain around his neck. In battle he would carry two pairs of pistols at the end of a silk sling across his shoulder. According to his wishes he was thrown overboard wearing his finest duds and ornaments.

 

About Bartholomew Roberts’ Shipboard Articles 1721. Pirates did not follow any civil laws. What they did was to draw up their own set of laws that they called “Articles”. All pirate ships had articles. These articles listed the things the crew found important, and the order in which they found them important.  Black Bart’s crew’s first matter of importance was the division of provisions and strong liquors. And it was all downhill from there…

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Bartholomew Roberts “Black Barty” was probably the most successful pirate, (after Henry Morgan) there ever was. He was born a Welshman in 1682 and was second mate on the Princess when her captain died. He then was named captain. His other ships were named the Royal Rover, Fortune, Royal Fortune, and Good Fortune. He captured more than 400 hundred ships from as far North as Newfoundland, through the Caribbean, South America and in 1722 was felled by grapeshot in the throat doing battle with a British warship off the coast of Guinea, Africa. Roberts was an attractive man and a snappy dresser. He would wear a rich crimson waistcoat and breeches, a hat with a red feather, and a diamond cross hanging from a gold chain around his neck. In battle he would carry two pairs of pistols at the end of a silk sling across his shoulder. According to his wishes he was thrown overboard wearing his finest duds and ornaments.

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Below is the text of Bartholomew Roberts’ Shipboard Articles 1721. The names available to be personalized are in red. They will be replaced everywhere in the document with Any names you choose. You can even add articles if you choose to.

Articles
(1. Pirate captain’s name)Captain Bartholomew Roberts
Drawn up by the (2. Pirate vessel’s name)Good Fortune crew as shipboard conduct

I. Every man has a vote in affairs of moment; has equal title to the fresh provisions, or strong liquors, at any time seized, and may use them at pleasure, unless a scarcity makes necessary, for the good of all, to vote a retrenchment.

II. Every man to be called fairly in turn, by list, on board of prizes because, they were on these occasions allowed a shift of clothes: but if they defrauded the company to the value of a dollar in plate, jewels, or money, marooning was their punishment. If the robbery was only betwixt one another, they contented themselves with slitting the ears and nose of him that was guilty, and set him on shore, not in an uninhabited place, but somewhere, where he was sure to encounter hardships.

III. No person to game at cards or dice for money.

IV. The lights and candles to be put out at eight o’clock at night: if any of the crew, after that hour still remained inclined for drinking, they were to do it on the open deck.

V. To keep their peace, pistols, and cutlass clean and fit for service.

VI. No boy or woman to be allowed amongst them. If any man were to be found seducing any of the latter sex, and carried her to sea, disguised, he was to suffer death.

VII. To desert their ship or quarters in battle, was punished with death or marooning.

VIII. No striking one another on board, but every man’s quarrels to be ended on shore, at sword and pistol.

IX. No man to talk of breaking up their way of living, till each had shared £1,000. If in order to this, any man should lose a limb, or become a cripple in their service, he was to have 800 dollars, out of the public stock, and for lesser hurts, proportionately.

X. The captain and quartermaster to receive two shares of prize: the master, boatswain, and gunner, one share and a half, and other officers one and a quarter.

XI. The musicians to have rest on the Sabbath Day, only by night, but the other six days and nights, not without special favour.

XII (3. Add optional article(s) here)

1721

PERSONALIZED: I want to personalize history. Above is the text of Bartholomew Roberts’ Shipboard Articles 1721. The names available to be personalized are in red. When ordering a personalized document please list the names to be changed in the text box on the order form along with the new names you have chosen. All names are optional.

1. Pirate captain’s name
2. Pirate vessel’s name
3. Add optional article(s) here

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